At 20-something, the world’s got me dizzy – Mankato Free Press

Vertigo and Dizziness Permanent Cure with Proven Natural Remedies

Fewer than two weeks from now, I celebrate another birthday — not an important one, but another one nonetheless.

Growing up I thought: I want to be 20-something. Those people have their things together — by 20-something, I, too, would have my life put together. Much better than being a teenager.

Boy, if only I could go back and slap my 15-year-old self into reality, but I’ll let her keep thinking that. She’s too young to corrupt quite yet.

And no one tells you that in your 20s, no one has it together. Maybe I’m just speaking for myself, but dang, 20s — you are a whole other beast.

The adult world is kind of thrown at you and what’s in that adult world? The kitchen will never fully be clean. Listening to Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5” finally makes sense and makes you a little sad. You finally realize why your dad would angrily walk into the room you were in and turn the light off — electricity is expensive, yo. And, personally, the worst one is having to schedule your own doctor and dentist appointments.

Shiver.

It’s such a weird age, too. It’s almost like being a teenager again but with bills. Mid-to-upper 20s, you’re old enough to know that sheets need to be washed every week, but how the hell do you fold a fitted sheet? It’s the age where you can eat ice cream for breakfast every day, though you know you shouldn’t. Most importantly, you don’t eat ice cream for breakfast.

And if you’re married, it’s an age where people keep asking when you’re going to have kids — though we explicitly state we’re not ready. (As a side note, don’t ask people this even with the best intention in mind. You never know what their situation might be. No need for extra pressure.)

Of course, there’s no guidebook as to what you should do as you begin to grow older, but there should be. I’m not talking about how to pay your taxes or how to fix a toilet, or how to bake a hotdish or even how to sew a button. Y’all, we got Google for that. Something things though, can’t necessarily be Googled — including how to fold a fitted sheet.

It’d be nice to have a guidebook of how to discover yourself in your 20s. What to do when you have a stress-induced mental breakdown and to say ‘Hey, it’s OK, man’ after said mental breakdown. Perhaps a little something to encourage those 20-somethings — that maybe legally you’re an adult but it’s still OK to have fun. Or maybe, like, what to do when the world seems scary but you feel the need to put on a brave face instead of crying because after all, you’re 20-something, you’ve got everything together.

Right?

OK … and maybe a killer tater tot hotdish recipe in that mix would be beneficial. I wouldn’t complain.

I don’t foresee any type of guidebook coming in the future, so I guess I’ll just let my 20-somethings — or anyone, really — know the things I’ve learned along the way:

• Mental health days are important. Take them. Don’t feel guilty about bingeing “Jane the Virgin” on Netflix all day in your jammies. Sometimes we need that. Just don’t let it become a daily thing.

• It’s OK to not feel great all the time. What isn’t OK is to not ask for help when you need it, even if it is just to vent.

• Stop being so hard on yourself. Yeah, maybe you made an ass of yourself at work or said something stupid or made a mistake. Learn from it, and I mean really learn from it, and then move on.

• Be aware of self-destructive or self-sabotaging tendencies. It’s a slippery slope. Get help, reach out to someone whether an online support group or someone you rely on.

• Call your parents more often.

Ultimately, you just gotta keep doing you, fam. And sometimes that’s scary. Admittedly, I’m still working on those things listed and I’ve learned that’s OK. Life’s not linear.

But you know what? I’m looking forward to my 30s. I’m sure to have my life together by then. Maybe by my 30s, I will have learned how to fold a damn fitted sheet.

Right?

Diana Rojo-Garcia can be reached at drojogarcia@mankatofreepress.com or at 507-344-6305.

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